My Favorite (Foodie) Things


In keeping with tradition, here is my annual Baker’s dozen of favorite foodie things for the chef or baker in your life! 

  1. La Boulangerie – Baking at Home by Gregoire Michaud.  I don’t know why I didn’t buy this sooner, but I am so excited to add it to my collection!  Gregoire is truly one of the most talented chefs I have ever seen, so who better to learn from? ($25)
  2. So Good.. Recipes. As any pastry chef will say, So Good is an amazing publication and I am very humbled to have been a part of it.  Now you can have recipes from the gods and demigods of pastry. (25€)
  3. Christmas Candy Molds by Global Sugar Arts.  I opted for the Christmas lights this year; watch for the entremet to drop next week. ($15)
  4. Tapered Rolling Pin from Williams Sonoma.  I much prefer the traditional French handle-free rolling pin to the American version. ($15)
  5. Tilt Bowls from Crate and Barrel.  I love this bowl for showcasing modern desserts.  It’s also perfect for displaying nuts, candy, and other holiday party fare. ($15)
  6. Togiharu Pastry Knife by Korin.  My love for this knife is well-documented and enduring. I recommend the larger size for faster pastry production. ($135)
  7. Diamond Sharpening Stone by Korin.  Its imperative to keep those knives sharp, and this stone is always level for better edge retention. ($110)
  8. All-Clad Belgian Waffle Maker from Williams Sonoma.  I bought this for my wife this year and it cranks out perfect waffles every Sunday morning. ($180)
  9. Steelite Tableware.  I’m a fan of the Float Plate, but they have a style to suit every taste. (prices vary)
  10. Macaron Boxes from BRP Box Shop.  With the sturdy tray insert, I can even ship my macarons to friends and family this Christmas. ($1 each)
  11. Cuisinart Spice and Nut Grinder from Williams Sonoma.  With this trusty gadget, I can whip up spice mixes and nut flours with ease. ($40)
  12. Japanese Mandoline Slicer by Benriner.  Prep produce like a pro with this handy tool. ($25)
  13. Quenelle Spoons.  Every pastry chef strives to make the perfect, egg-shaped quenelle.  You can use a sauce spoon like this one from JB Prince, but I prefer to hunt through antique shops. ($10)

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above may be “affiliate links,” meaning that if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. I have not been otherwise endorsed to recommend these products, all of which I use personally.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” 


About Joe the Baker

Joe the Baker is a classically-trained pastry chef who specializes in French macarons and viennoiserie. He currently sells his delicious confections online, at the Coppell Farmers Market, and at DFW-area gourmet grocers.

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